Health Insurance

Let’s face it–in today’s world, health insurance is a necessity. In fact, most U.S. citizens and legal residents must have qualifying health insurance or face a penalty tax. Yet the cost of medical care is soaring higher every year, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult (and in some cases, impossible) to pay medical costs out of pocket. Whether you already have health insurance or want to get it, here’s some basic information to help you understand it.

Know what’s out there
The cost and range of protection that your health insurance provides will depend on your insurance provider and the particular policy you purchase. You may have comprehensive health insurance that involves several types of coverage, or basic coverage that includes hospital, surgical, and physicians’ expenses. In addition, major medical coverage is necessary in the event of a catastrophic accident or illness. Many plans also cover prescriptions, mental health services, and other health-related activities (e.g., health-club memberships).

When it comes to health insurance, HMO, PPO, and POS are more than just letters. You need to know the types of health plans available so that you can make an informed decision. You can obtain health insurance through traditional insurers like Blue Cross/Blue Shield, health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), point of service (POS) plans, and exclusive provider organizations (EPOs).

 

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By clicking on the Get Covered Now button, you'll be redirected to our site where you can compare plans and enroll in an affordable, ACA compliant plan in your area.

Traditional insurers: These plans usually allow you flexibility regarding choice of doctors and other health-care providers. Some policies reimburse you for covered expenses, while others make payments directly to medical providers. You will pay a deductible and a percentage of each bill, known as coinsurance.

HMO: Health maintenance organizations cover only medical treatment provided by physicians and facilities within their networks. You must choose a primary care physician, who will either approve or deny any requests to see a specialist. You usually pay a fixed monthly fee for health-care coverage, as well as small co-payments (e.g., $10 for each office visit and prescription).

PPO: Preferred provider organizations do not require members to seek care from PPO physicians and hospitals, but there is usually strong financial incentive to do so (in terms of percentage of reimbursement). You usually pay a fixed monthly fee for health-care coverage, as well as small co-payments (e.g., $10 for each office visit and prescription).

POS: Point of service plans combine characteristics of the HMO and PPO. You must choose a primary care physician to be responsible for all of your referrals within the POS network. Although you can choose to go outside the network with this type of plan, your health care will be covered at a lower level.

EPO: Exclusive provider organizations are basically PPOs with one important difference: EPOs provide no coverage for non-network care.

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The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. 360 Partners LLC dba Harris Advisors, its affiliates, subsidiaries, employees, agents and/or representatives do not provide tax, investment, or legal advice. Please consult with your own tax, investment, or legal advisor with any questions. Licensed in DE, GA, MD, NC, NJ, PA, and VA.

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